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Famed theoretical physicist calls NASA beaming Earth info into outer space a 'horrible idea'

Critics are warning against a NASA plan to beam information about Earth into outer space, with theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku saying it is a “horrible idea.”

Brian Kilmeade said the plan reportedly includes information about DNA structure, physics, diagrams of human bodies and geolocation.

Kaku told “Jesse Watters Primetime” that many people believe aliens are more like E.T., the extraterrestrial made for the screen by Steven Spielberg, rather than potentially belligerent beings that could take over the Earth and kill its inhabitants.

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The Pentagon on Monday released three videos showing "unidentified aerial phenomena."

The Pentagon on Monday released three videos showing "unidentified aerial phenomena."
(iStock)

“The fundamental mistake is they assume that the aliens are like E.T.; warm and friendly, but they could be like the Borg out to rampage over our corner of the galaxy. We can’t assume the best case scenario in this situation,” he said.

Kaku added that the Orson Welles classic “War of the Worlds” is another potential warning.

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American theoretical physicist Michio Kaku at the 2018 St Petersburg International Economic Forum

American theoretical physicist Michio Kaku at the 2018 St Petersburg International Economic Forum
(Photo by Vladimir Smirnov\TASS via Getty Images  |  John Kraus/Handout via REUTERS |  )

“It wasn’t that the Martians hated Earthlings. No, we were just in the way — they wanted the Earth, and they had the technology to run over us, so we had to be careful,” he said.

Kaku noted the current plan is a follow-up to a 1974 project when a message was beamed from the now-defunct Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. That year, an interstellar message was beamed to a distant star cluster.

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In this recent view of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, the 96-foot line-feed antenna that once dangled above the telescope dish is still missing. It broke off during Hurricane Maria and punctured the dish below.

In this recent view of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, the 96-foot line-feed antenna that once dangled above the telescope dish is still missing. It broke off during Hurricane Maria and punctured the dish below.
(NAIC)

“In retrospect, I think that was a dumb idea: Playing Russian roulette with a loaded gun, not knowing who’s out there, what their intentions are. I think it was really foolhardy.”

Kilmeade remarked that it could turn into a real-life version of the 1996 film “Independence Day.”

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